Playing House

When I was younger, I loved playing house. I would go outside and play in our log cabin playhouse (it was huge and made out of real wood by our neighbor) for hours. The playhouse was the place to be on our block, the entire backyard made into a kid’s playground dream. We were extremely fortunate that our parents were able to make us an awesome place to play, which we did during all seasons and types of weather. I always pretended that I had twin babies (I had the Baby Tumble Surprise Twins- super popular Christmas gift in 1997) and that I had the coolest house and cars, etc. I imagined I had the perfect life, perfect babies and perfect house.

Flash forward 23 years and I’m still playing house, except it’s real and it’s a lot harder than I ever anticipated. Also, instead of legit twin baby dolls, I have “Irish twins”, one of which is the equivalent of 2 1/2 kids. Now I don’t think think I could ever have that boring, plain life. I got my first taste of being a normal mom last night. Since Derek and Greyson were in Philadelphia at CHOP, Roslynn and I decided to go out to dinner with my good friend, Julia and her boyfriend. It was so odd leaving work and picking up one child to go to a restaurant to actually sit and eat. I felt like a normal person again. Afterwards, once we got home, the house was too quiet. Ironically, I got 5 hours of sleep (most I have in months) and I was more tired today than normal! Essentially what I have learned in the past 24 hours, is that I need to be a normal person sometimes and make time for normal things. I also really need the excitement of Greyson in my day. It was so lonely without his belly laugh and the sound of him staircase surfing at all random hours of the night.

Waiting for Julia to arrive for dinner

The next bit of information is per Derek, so I am simply relaying this.

Greyson and Derek checked into CHOP around 5:30pm. It took a good bit of time to get all the electrodes on his head, cap put on and wires stuffed into the backpack he carried around. The electrode placement is always extremely difficult for G, especially since the glue to hold the electrodes on, is super stinky and gross. After having the opportunity to eat dinner and relax, Greyson fell asleep. Unfortunately, he did not stay asleep through the night. After tossing and turning and a tough morning, he was finally discharged from CHOP around 1:00pm. Luckily, the staff was able to get the data they needed and even got the glue out of his hair before he was discharged.

After 5 different seizure medications and two years of finding a medicine regiment to control the epilepsy, we have finally received good news.

Greyson had zero instances of focal seizures while he slept and while awake. This essentially means that the Onfi is working! He has had minimal side effects with it and I’m really feeling good that we finally have found the right mix of meds. 835 days after his first diagnosis, we finally have a solution.

Finally

I’m waiting for a final report from the neurologist, but this is the best news we have heard in over two years. We needed this good news. We have been really struggling over the past couple of months, but all of those feelings are currently on mute. We are so excited. We still have a long ways to go, but this was the perfect push we needed to keep our chins up. Excuse me if I am giddy tomorrow, but TGIF and we have a successful medicine managing seizures that were once deemed uncontrollable.

Happy face for my happy baby boy

The World of Autism

2020 has been off to an interesting start. Interesting is the best word possible to describe the mixed emotions we have had since entering the new year.

Whenever I see people I know out in public (work, stores, church and other places I actually go), everyone always asks how Greyson is doing. I almost always respond “we are hanging in” or “he’s an interesting kiddo”. The truth resonating in my mind is always, “why do I try to play this off like it’s no big deal and that I am managing this fine”, when deep down it physically breaks my heart if I put too much thought into our situation. I thought that as G got older and we learned his routine, tics, compulsions and behaviors, things would get easier. Truth is, as we learn more about him and his condition and the bigger/stronger he gets, the worse things seem to be evolving.

I have found myself telling parents recently that “the world of Autism is an entirely different world. No books, research or degree is going to prepare you for it.” And it’s so true. The world of raising a child with ASD is an entirely different ball game. Even working as a TSS in the past with kiddos with similar disabilities as G, I never would have imagined that raising him would be the hardest job of my life. Working full-time and being a full-time mother of a child with special needs and a very busy sibling, is becoming quite the challenge.

I must say that my work has been keeping me grounded in actual reality. Talking to other parents, listening to their stories and putting their child’s faces with their name, has really given me solace that I am not alone in the world of Autism. WE are not alone in this world. We, as many other families, take our world day by day. Never assuming that one day will be the same as the next, because it never will be.

Medically, G has been grand-mal seizure free for a several weeks now, adjusting well to Onfi, which is is most recent anti-convulsant prescription. Things were going fairly well until January. Not sure what (if anything) had changed, but his impulsiveness became unmanageable. Everywhere we went, everything we did, always ended up in something broken, destroyed or someone injured. We were fed up. We met up with his child psychiatrist and started a dose of clonidine. Immediately we saw a difference in Greyson. We traded impulsiveness and hyperactivity for extremely fatigued and aggressive Greyson. On a positive note, despite the tiredness and negative behaviors, G has been doing extremely well on the clonidine. He is happy again, sweet and loving. He does not get really aggressive unless we deny him access to an item he wants, or if he is extremely tired.

Extremely sorry to my mother in law for this one

Post tornado Greyson after a morning tantrum

Though there are many negative things that can be said about his destruction, aggression, lack of sleep and self-injury, he has been doing very well with school. He absolutely loves school and enjoys going to his class, even though they make him work. School has reported that he’s extremely fatigued and falls asleep during instructional time, most days. His ABA service comes out after lunch/naptime and he seems to be doing well with this as well, even enjoying his “roller coaster” toy for reinforcement.

Tomorrow, Greyson and Derek will be traveling to CHOP in a Philadelphia for another 24 hour EEG. This is overnight EEG #3 and his 5th EEG he’s had to date. We are hoping this new EEG will show if Greyson’s seizures are better managed during sleep, with the medication regiment he’s currently on. We are also hoping to see some more brain activity from the left side of his brain, which is his “lazy side”.

I used to have high hopes the night before a procedure, appointment or test, praying we would get answers or a cure. Now I have become so desensitized to how these appointments typically go, it just feels like another test and another appointment. If the Onfi is managing his seizures well, we could potentially discuss decreasing the medications all together, but depending on which neurologist you ask, we may or may not have much luck. Greyson’s specific type of focal epilepsy is very rare, specifically the seizures when he is asleep.

Electrical status epilepticus in slow wave sleep (ESES) is a rare, age-related, self-limited disorder characterized as epilepsy with different seizure types, neuropsychological impairment in the form of global or selective regression of cognitive functions, motor impairment, and typical electroencephalographic (EEG) findings of continuous epileptic activity occupying 85% of nonrapid eye movement sleep. 

The neurologist and psychiatrist also have a theory that Greyson is so aggressive and injuring himself over the past couple weeks, because he’s tired and not sleeping well. He gets migraines when he’s extremely tired, so I can only imagine how he must be feeling. He obviously isn’t aware that this EEG is taking place tomorrow, but please keep fingers crossed that we will see some improvement in his night time seizures.

Only way he will sleep- cuddling with sissy

Reflections of a Year: 2019

Sums up 2019 perfectly

Skimming through my posts from 2019, I realized it was a lot more eventful than I thought. No wonder I’m exhausted every single day!

Exactly one year ago, I was reminiscing about 2018, which was an awful year. Awful may actually be too nice. We lost several family members in 2018, and we continued to get more and more confused about Greyson’s behaviors/meds/condition/treatment.

When we started 2019, Greyson was refusing clothing and eating his own feces. We also began 2019 with absolutely zero visible seizures. Hard to believe that G only began having Grand-mal seizures in May of this year, it definitely feels a lot longer.

Along with the first grand-mal seizure, we had lots of “firsts” in 2019: first dentist appointment, first family vacation since being diagnosed, first day of preschool, first ER trip, first extended EEG and first set of stitches. Despite the chaotic day-to-day events in 2019, I am so relieved that we didn’t have a repeat of 2018.

We also learned a lot about Greyson’s condition over this past year. Along with the diagnosis of Autism, G has several different co-morbid conditions that seem to all be impacting his every day life, including Periventricular Leukomalacia (white matter brain disease caused by brain damage at birth) and the genetic mutation of the STAMBP gene. We still have a far way to go, but we have finally settled on the idea that Derek and I may never know what truly is going on with Greyson and what the future holds.

Since my last post, Greyson has begun new medicine for his (possible) Electrical Status Epilepticus in Sleep (ESES) diagnosis. We are currently on a trial medication named Onfi for this particular condition, which is essentially when an individual has continuous spiked waves in the brain while they are sleeping. The plan for this medicine is to continue the Onfi and the Vimpat (his daily anti-convulsion med). We will have another 48-hour EEG in February, this time with admission into CHOP’s pediatric neurology program in Philadelphia. We are also waiting for more diagnostic testing of G’s DNA/Genetic Samples. With the development in science and research on genetic conditions, we are hopeful that someday we will have more answers about the STAMBP gene and Mic-Cap Syndrome.

Roslynn had a tough second half to the year, with a lot of G’s aggression being taken out on her. Luckily, she has been playing and interacting much better with Greyson over the past two months, and I am definitely seeing more reciprocal play between them. She is enjoying her weekly dance class, preschool, playing with her cousins and walking my parent’s puppy, Charlie. She is set to begin kindergarten next year and though I am not ready for that, she certainly is. She loves to learn and has a fun, sweet and gentle personality and is the best behaved 4-year-old I know.

Derek has been extremely busy with his (not so) new job at T.W. Ponessa & Associates. He has been busy seeing clients, completing Functional Behavior Assessments (FBAs), making data charts, token systems and most importantly, enjoying having a job that he loves to wake up and go to. I am so proud of him and his accomplishments and look forward to what 2020 has in store for him.

Last but not least, I have been keeping myself busy with the typical: working full-time, managing two children and one grown man’s schedules and appointments and keeping my sanity (or the best I can fake it!). I am going into my 8th year at CADD and loving my new desk/tasks that the end of 2019 has brought my way. I’m looking forward to 2020 and the possible professional and personal endeavors that may come my way.

I always joke that once you hit 25, New Year’s Eve doesn’t matter anymore. I’m honestly impressed that I have enough energy to type this and that I’m not zonked on the couch right now. Kids should be in bed soon and I will be ringing 2020 with Derek, most likely by both of us passing out (from exhaustion) by 10 PM. I am more than okay with a quiet end to 2019 and hope that 2020 will bring peace, comfort and happiness to our family and all our friends, family, supporters, coworkers and all who support us on a daily basis.

Saying goodbye to 2019 by posting some of my favorite photos and cheers to 2020 with sparkling apple juice!

Snuggle Buddies
His number one friend
2019 School Photo
Showing off her coloring skills. Waiting for her surgery (tubes/adenoid removal)
Tap Class
He loves the lights
4:30 am Christmas Morning faces
Feline watch dog
Could have been our Christmas Card photo but I didn’t send any LOL
Little Diva in the making
Besties
Christmas Eve Goobers
Cheesy Smiles for Momma
Derek and Rozzie at her class Thanksgiving party
Funny faces and dress up
Zonked with Duke
Chocolate face
The fur babies

Chances

The past two weeks have been really tough. Greyson has barely slept, which means nobody in the Martin house is resting well, causing lots of grumpy kids. A new nightly ritual is that while we are eating dinner, G will impulsively throw his entire plate of food on the floor and scream bloody murder. He typically runs upstairs to the nursery and has a tantrum for about 1-2 hours until he’s completely worn out.

The lack of sleep is extremely hard on us, both mentally and physically, but I am hopeful that this is just a rough patch. G did see the neurologist last week and they switched when he takes his meds around, hoping to relieve some of his nausea, drowsiness and aggression. Unfortunately, this combination of meds has caused Greyson to become extremely aggressive. The aggression is typically taken out on the dog, then me and Roslynn. The PTSD and severe anxiety from previous attacks, has left Roz completely terrified of G. He utters a tiny whine, and she’s hiding and screaming that he’s “going to get me (her)”. This is really difficult too. It ends up being a vicious cycle: G freaks out, Roz freaks out, G freaks out because Roz is freaking out, causing G to become more aggressive and angry.

So out of it and sleepy

One of the many faces of G

Towards the end of last week, G had run out of 2 of his prescriptions, so we were out of luck. The insurance was holding off on refilling them due to the need of labs and information from the doc before they would approve anything. The few days that he was without any medicine were the best days that he has had in the past few months. Almost immediately after we started up the meds again, Greyson was back to his aggressive self. Every single night since restarting meds, G has been tired, grumpy, aggressive and overall miserable. Derek and I have both been in agreement with this, but we have decided to take our chances.

The thought that Greyson could have a seizure and have serious issues, is absolutely terrifying. As much as I want to feel confident and comfortable with our decisions, deep down I am so scared and worried. Since stopping the meds, he’s been so happy, energetic and sweet. He’s finally smiling, laughing and able to enjoy things like toys and playing with Roslynn.

My happy boy

I try really hard to put myself in Greyson’s shoes. I know that I would never want to be drugged up all day on several meds, crying and screaming because I am so tired and feel awful. The chances of G having a seizure are high without his meds, but having the risk of seizures is much better than the negative side effects from the meds.

Difficult decisions and discussions are expected in a marriage and family. I never expected that we would be making decisions that could impact our baby’s life forever. I certainly hope that we are taking the right chances and making the best decision for him.

King Size

Greyson has gone from 3 seizure meds, down to 2 in the past month. This transition has caused him to act out, become extremely impulsive, aggressive and nocturnal, though he doesn’t really sleep during the day either.

Derek and I can deal with the lack of sleep, but the aggression is the worst of it. It all started with aggression towards Duke during meals, then during tantrums, but now anytime G is around Duke, he’s biting, hitting, pulling on or trying to tackle him. The aggression then began to target Derek and I, but as former TSS, we can handle anything. When the aggression became centered towards Roslynn, we knew it was best to remove her from the situation, for her own safety.

Nasty bite per Greyson

The hardest decision that we have had to make thus far has been moving Roslynn out of our house, temporarily. My parents have been so incredibly supportive and opened their guest room door to Roz, so she wouldn’t be attacked by Greyson anymore. Watching her curl-up in a corner, violently shaking, crying and screaming “he’s gonna get me, help me mommy!”, was a push over the edge that we needed to make this decision. My parents presenting this offer also came at the best time possible, after an extremely difficult two weeks. I thought that maybe Roz would be upset that she was going to be away from us, but she’s living her best life at Nana/Pop-Pop’s house. The best feature of staying with them, according to Roslynn, is the KING SIZE BED!! She is loving having such a big bed all to herself and is getting some much needed, overdue attention.

Roslynn and I are glued at the hip. She is the baby girl I always hoped for: a 4 year-old little genius with an amazing ear for music. She is so timid and kind, and she has the sweetest little voice and personality. This has been very difficult for us, but especially for me. I truly feel incomplete and empty without her, though I see her every day and call/FaceTime her multiple times a day. Luckily the weekend is coming soon, which means I can stay with her for sleepovers in said King Size bed! This is all temporary, just until Greyson is stabilized on his medications and the aggression has subsided or at least becomes manageable.

Moving onto some more happy thoughts…..

My favorite time of year has finally arrived. I love Halloween, Thanksgiving and the fall. I adore the colors on the trees, the crisp air and the smell of wood burning in a fireplace. This year, Roslynn has chosen to be Snow White for trick or treat night, but that has changed almost daily. Greyson managed to make it to one house last year, before we had to return home due to a giant tantrum. We have stuck with the Star Wars theme for the past two years, but need suggestions for this years costume.

Yoda 2017

2018 Wookie

Roslynn really hopes that he will go as Dopey….though I don’t think G would keep the hat/ears on, or any part of the costume either. Naturally I am so indecisive, so I never know what the kids should go as- suggestions are appreciated!

Getting through this tough time with med transitions, growth spurts, no sleep and full-time work, takes a strong team. Derek and I know how extremely important family is, so we agreed before getting married, that we wouldn’t bring kids into the world if we weren’t prepared to go through it together, for life. I’m glad to say that we are pushing through, as a team, to conquer these rough times. It seems like most parents that have kids with special needs, tend to end up divorced directly because of their child and the stressors that accompany a disability. I see it every single day at work: many families that come in without the other parent being involved, or a nasty custody battle is taking place over the child. It just makes the already difficult situation so much worse. I’m extremely blessed to have such a wonderful husband, family, in-laws and friends, who all support us and provide us with the best opportunities and care for our children. We could never imagine doing this without them!

In the Halloween spirit, I do encourage those not as familiar with the “Blue Pumpkin” initiative, to do some research. The best way we can all learn about those who may be different from us, is by educating ourselves and others. This is how acceptance and understanding becomes contagious. Let’s start a virus of Autism education for those unfamiliar with the condition, and spread the only way to “cure” the symptoms of ASD- acceptance, love, understanding and kindness. Even the smallest gesture goes a far way.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.newsweek.com/blue-bucket-halloween-autism-trick-treat-1465718%3famp=1

Happy (early) Halloween, y’all and please send me costume ideas for G!

Keeping the Faith

I have officially turned into an antisocial hermit! Despite my flaws in responding to texts, calls and emails from friends and family, I have become a pro at running on 3-4 hours of sleep per night, juggling a full-time job, managing appointments and services AND (trying) to keep it all together, (which is hard for any parent, let alone a parent of a special needs child.)

It’s so hard leaving them in the morning!

The fall always begins the downward spiral into my winter hibernation mode, which is the hardest season for me. I have an extremely difficult time with the constant darkness, not only because I am blind at night, but I hate the cold, snow and any temperatures below 68 degrees. Fortunately, I was able to survive last winter by relying a LOT on Derek, since he wasn’t working full-time hours. Derek finally got his license and a full-time job! This is his first official salary job that he’s had since we first met, which is a HUGE deal for our family! Though it’s less hours he will be at home, I am so happy that he’s finally found a job that he is passionate about and that he doesn’t dread going to every day.

This past Sunday, our pastor at church delivered a sermon that was especially applicable to our family’s situation. The sermon discussed faith- where it comes from, how it is a personalized experience for each person and how one finds it on their own (or sometimes with help). I’ve never been much of a “religious” person per say, partly because it felt too ritualistic for me, but also because I never fully felt like I was comfortable expressing my beliefs.

Faith isn’t easy to find and it certainly isn’t easy to maintain, especially when life throws trying times at you. In the beginning of our diagnosis search, I had a lot faith. Faith in believing that we would find out what is wrong with G and that we would get the help he needs. Even today, 700 days later searching for answers and enduring no sleep, getting hit, kicked, bit, grabbed and head banged, we still find a way to maintain our faith. It would be a huge lie if I said that there aren’t times where I am so angry at God and myself because I don’t have a “normal” son. I used to pray for the day that we found the right combination of meds for him, hoping I could have a stereotypical “mama’s boy” someday. Yet, our situation continues to get more difficult as Greyson continues to grow and get stronger, and his aggression and temper continue to increase. He is transitioning between seizure meds again, which has proven to be our most difficult struggle at this time, but the sliver of hope that we will find something that works, is what keeps us going. I try to see positives in every single situation possible, but more recently, I’ve been losing that momentum. 3 years of little-to-no sleep, my own medical issues, juggling work and managing a list of weekly appointments, has begun to catch up to me. I attempt to put on a happy face and appear that I have everything under control, but in reality, I am a mess on the inside. The extreme stress of it all is ruining my overall health, my relationships with almost everyone I interact with and has me in a constant state of exhaustion.

700 days of this journey. Even typing it feels overwhelming. I’ve managed to forget my guiding force behind our journey: there are families going through far worse than we are.

I need that reminder tattooed on my forehead or something. We have so much to be grateful for and the sermon from Sunday reminded me of that. We have our difficulties, but our child is physically healthy (for the most part), has happy moments and is the sweetest little boy around. We also have a brilliant daughter who is on her way to become the first doctor in the Smith/Martin/Zanowski/Redcay family line. We also have a dog that literally drives us insane and ensures daily abuse from Greyson, but he continues to adore G and puts up with his aggression to keep him safe. So many blessings we have! We know the hard times are testing, but a daily reminder of the positives, is what will keep our faith, and our fight alive.

Most comfortable pillow, ever.

“Uh-Duhhhhhhhh”!

Derek and I have begun to decipher Greyson’s vocal stims. Luckily, this informs us if he’s happy, sad, angry, or that a tantrum is about to start. He has 3 distinct sounds he typically makes:

“Digdigdigdig a digdigdooo”- he’s happy and wants to play.

“Duka duka duka takaduka”- he is getting upset or needs something.

And finally, the scariest of all stims, “Duh, AH-DUHHHHHH!”- this one typically means that you better watch out because this kid is about to throw a massive tantrum, aggression and all.

Derek and I weren’t sure how Greyson was going to react to this week. He had his first day of school yesterday, had a sedated MRI/MRA today and will have another appointment upcoming on Thursday. Definitely an “Uh-Duhhhhh” kind of week.

We received Greyson’s preschool placement on Friday and he began yesterday morning. He was placed at Reidenbaugh elementary school in Manheim Township, in the IU-13 preschool room. Having worked there for the 2012-2013 school year, I am very familiar with the building and the areas that Greyson would be learning/playing in. Due to our work schedules, Derek would be dropping G off at school, Pappy would pick up @ 11:15 and Roslynn would be with my dad on MWF (her preschool starts in September).

Derek dropped G off at Reidenbaugh at 8:00 am. He was very confused and fussy when he realized he wasn’t going to the typical place (Grammy/Pappy’s House) he has been going for 3 years. Once they got to the special education wing of the school, Greyson was actually excited. He willingly walked into the school, holding his PCA’s (Personal Care Assistant) hand. Much to my surprise, he was happy when Rick picked him up at the end of the first day! Not sure who was more nervous- Derek and I, or Greyson, for him to begin school. It’s extremely difficult to leave your child in the hands of staff you’ve never met, with other kiddos that he doesn’t know.

Waiting to go in the school!

Because he did so well (and I think Pappy really missed him), he had a lunch date with Rick after school at McDonalds. He did great! Probably the 2nd or 3rd time that he’s ever been at a sit-down place for food. Derek and I are hoping that the structured setting of the school will help G become more compliant. At least compliant enough to take him out to do things in public.

Lunch time with Pappy!

Today, we were up at 4 am to head off to Philadelphia for Greyson’s MRI/MRA at CHOP. The drive is typically smooth until we get off of the turnpike at Valley Forge, then we fight traffic until we are in the city. Expecting this, we left about 15 minutes earlier than we needed to, just so we had time to stop if we needed and to fight the bumper-to-bumper Tuesday morning traffic.

Entering the CHOP campus

We made it to the hospital with 7 minutes to spare for parking, security clearance and check-in. I always think that things like this will get easier. The bigger the city, the bigger the risk, the bigger the hospital, but it never does. If you know me, you know that I used to love cities, but now I loathe them. I am a homebody that would prefer to live in the middle of nowhere, with an amazing view of farmland, and no neighbors around for miles. But because I grew up on the outskirts of Lancaster City and with my frequent trips to NYC in my younger years, I am pretty good with navigating my way around. Greyson was blissfully unaware of why were were at the hospital, until we went back to the prep room. That’s when his “white coat” syndrome kicked in.

The nurses and docs knew in advance that G was a complicated kiddo, who hated doctors (rightfully so with how many times he’s been to the doctor in his short 3 years alive). Childlife was present, which was amazing because they helped keep him entertained until the sedation team came in and explained everything to us. Because of his allergy to red dye, the anesthesiologist administered relaxation medication via a nasal spray into G’s nose. This would relax him enough to get his IV in for the actual sedation med.

Side note: I love the YouTube videos of kids who get their wisdom teeth out and are super high afterwards, acting all crazy. Which is exactly the way that G was acting. I joked with the doctors that I needed to take an extra dose home for him, because he was so relaxed and care-free. I had never seen him so loopy.

Once his IV was in, he was sedated with IV meds and was out cold. The doctor said we could expect for G to be in the MRI machine for about an hour to and hour and a half, so Derek and I sat in the waiting room for the procedure. It was fairly quiet, so we were able to make calls we needed to, regarding his schooling and nurse coverage, etc.

90 minutes came and left. I wasn’t getting nervous quite yet, but once 2 hours came, I was getting concerned. I watched other parents go back to their kids in recovery, especially ones that came out to the waiting room well after we did. Finally, the nurses called our name and we were able to back to the recovery room. Greyson was still out cold, and the nurse informed us that he had been in recovery for about 45 minutes, but he needed to have a device inserted in his mouth/throat to keep his airway open, due to severe snoring. The doctor came in a few minutes later, as I was trying to wake G up, and informed us that he definitely should be checked for a tonsil/adenoid removal because of how large they are. (Great, another thing to add to the laundry list of specialists we have to see). I wasn’t surprised because I too had issues with snoring/breathing when I was younger because of the exact same reason.

G finally woke up about 15 minutes later and was still extremely drugged up. Despite a tantrum after removing him from a play car that childlife brought in for him to play with, Greyson did fantastic. CHOP is the way to go for any/all procedures. The drive is a pain, but the care G received was the best we have received yet. They really are a great hospital and go above and beyond for their patients.

The car he played in to pass the time

We got him up and drinking juice, so we were discharged fairly quickly and were on our way. Now the hardest part. We wait. Waiting is the worst of all, but because we did the imaging at CHOP, our new neurologist should be able to read it ASAP and give us results tomorrow or Thursday. Maybe right in time for a great 30th birthday gift, that his MRI/MRA is looking better now than one year ago?

Seriously out cold- could barely get him up!
Also discovered he has 3 chipped teeth- luckily he has a dentist appointment on Tuesday!